Bike Lane Classification - New York

According to the New York City classifications, bike lanes fall into three categories. [1]
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Class I

Class I bike lanes are "physically separated from motor vehicle and pedestrian traffic," providing a buffer against faster, heavier vehicles. This physical separation can come in the form of a tree-lined path, a sidewalk, a concrete buffer, bollards, or a line of traffic cones.

In some instances, the physical barrier can consist of parked cars themselves. This can be accomplished (and, indeed, has been accomplishedon Ninth Avenue in New York) by switching the locations of a bike lane and a parking area, so that cyclists ride next to the sidewalk and drivers park next to moving traffic. This type of Class I lane is relatively easy to implement, meets the objective of physical protection without diminishing space for parking, and it has the added advantage of preventing "dooring." The cycle track on Manhattan's Ninth Avenue is an example of such a physically separated bike lane.

Class II

Class II bike lanes are demarcated by paint on asphalt. In some cases, the entire lane is painted a distinct color so as to be distinguished easily from the rest of the street. In most cases, the lane is marked by a stripe, often thicker than a standard dotted white line. Some Class II lanes also receive a stencil in the middle of the lane (also refered to as a "sharrow").

Class III

Class III lanes are bike routes that are represented only by posted route signs.

ALSO ON THE LIVABLE STREETS NETWORK


REFERENCES

[1] Herman, Komanoff, Orcutt and Perry. "Bicycle Blueprint." Tranportation Alternatives. 1993; revised 1998.

PHOTO REFERENCES

[1] Herman, Komanoff, Orcutt and Perry. "Bicycle Blueprint." Tranportation Alternatives. 1993; revised 1998.

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